POEAE

New battery material goes with the flow

From: Science News
publisher: Ashlee Peng
Time: 2017-08-18
Summary: Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have engineered a new material to be used in redox flow batteries, which are particularly useful for storing electricity for the grid. The material consists of carefully structured molecules designed to be particularly electrochemically stable in order to prevent the battery from losing energy to unwanted reactions.

A new material shows promise for batteries that store electricity for the grid. The material, created by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, consists of carefully structured molecules designed to be particularly electrochemically stable in order to prevent the battery from losing energy to unwanted reactions. The results of the experiment, some of the best ever recorded for batteries of this type, are published today in Advanced Energy Materials.


In this type of battery, called nonaqueous redox flow, energy is stored in negatively and positively charged solutions inside large tanks.

"Bicyclic substitution allows us to avoid compromising between stability and reversibility," said Jingjing Zhang. "Maximizing these two properties is key in engineering more efficient batteries for powering entire buildings and even larger systems in the future."

Contact:Ashlee Peng
Email:poeae@liliangbattery.com       

Website: www.liliangbattery.com

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